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  4. Player choice is at the heart of what makes this hero shooter tick. There's nothing quite as satisfying as blasting the entire enemy team off the stage with Torvald’s hyper beam. Reanimating after you die as Terminus and vaporizing any opponents too slow to get away never gets old, and seeing Willo’s multiplying seedling attack come your way inspires horror. But the greatest achievement is that Paladins: Champions of the Realm allows you to dictate your plystyle. Whether it's adding to the knockback of weapons or increasing the duration of your shield, Paladins empowers experimentation and true customization. Amid the thrilling battles is a diverse five-on-five hero shooter that puts the power of choice front and center. Whether it’s the wonderfully imagined characters, the in-depth card and item customization systems, or the inoffensive free-to-play model, there are plenty of options that make Paladins a worthy competitor for Overwatch. It’s a shame that Paladins doesn’t put a bigger focus on the lore of this world, as almost all of its 36 champions are packed with interesting nuances. Seris is an incredibly ominous character and her charm bleeds into her soul-snatching attacks and dimension-jumping abilities. Her ultimate literally has her casting her soul core onto the battlefield to drag nearby enemies into a tear in reality and it screams of personality. The explanation for her character may be limited to a page of text on her champion screen (as not every developer can afford Blizzard’s expensive-looking animated shorts), but her presence on the battlefield speaks volumes. Not only are these small details present in each character's appearance, but their gameplay styles artistically offer enough variety to make switching to a new character a brand-new experience.It’s a similar story with rest of the cast. Bomb King is a living bomb that can throw stackable explosives and his stun bomb that’s modeled after his own character compliments his clever design. Even though Inara and Terminus both hail from the same mysterious living-stone race, their play styles couldn’t be any more different. Inara is all about damage reduction and status changing effects with abilities like her Warder’s Field that dramatically slows down any enemy that draws near, while Terminus has a huge focus on melee combat. Not every character hits the target; Vivian’s generic design doesn’t offer any hints of an interesting backstory and her uninspired and boring Light Machine Gun moveset is a small nitpick in a sea of wonderful characters. Paladins’ wide range of champions fits elegantly within the four classes. Having a front-line champion like the technology-obsessed Torvald is great for capturing the main objective, and the celestial monk Jenos can use his support status to make sure the tank never goes down. Damage champions like the dragon Drogoz can use his rockets to apply pressure, and flanking champions like Skye can stealthily cast out enemies with her poison bolts. What’s beautiful is that champions like the electrifying shaman Grohk blur the lines between support and damage while the front-line pyromaniac Fernando can still do excellent work as a flank. The true depth to Paladins lies underneath. That’s all on the surface, but the true depth to Paladins lies underneath. Unlike most hero games, here you’re not completely pigeonholed into a specific role by your choice of character because you can customize them so heavily. Every player picks five out of 16 cards to create a preset loadout tailored to the champion you choose that enhances stats and moves during a match. Say you gave the eccentric Moji and her two-headed companion a card that heals her whenever she uses her Magic Barrier, but after a few matches you notice that using Bon Appetit, her ultimate attack that transforms an enemy into an easy to kill snack, is of more importance. Rather than scrapping the whole build and starting over, you can assign 15 upgrade points any way you like, letting you decide to improve either the healing power of Magic Barrier or the charge rate for the ultimate. Experimental loadouts like these are Paladins’ most important feature, and you’ll likely find yourself constantly going back to tweak and improve your card decks. Furthermore, being able to pick from multiple loadouts at the start of a match allows you to adapt to different team compositions and maps, providing a greater sense of control. PALADINS Paladins: Champions of the Realm Review Player choice is at the heart of what makes this hero shooter tick. By Michael Koczwara Updated: 19 Jun 2018 9:12 pm Posted: 16 May 2018 1:05 am There’s nothing quite as satisfying as blasting the entire enemy team off the stage with Torvald’s hyper beam. Reanimating after you die as Terminus and vaporizing any opponents too slow to get away never gets old, and seeing Willo’s multiplying seedling attack come your way inspires horror. But the greatest achievement is that Paladins: Champions of the Realm allows you to dictate your playstyle. Whether it's adding to the knockback of weapons or increasing the duration of your shield, Paladins empowers experimentation and true customization. Amid the thrilling battles is a diverse five-on-five hero shooter that puts the power of choice front and center. Whether it’s the wonderfully imagined characters, the in-depth card and item customization systems, or the inoffensive free-to-play model, there are plenty of options that make Paladins a worthy competitor for Overwatch. It’s a shame that Paladins doesn’t put a bigger focus on the lore of this world, as almost all of its 36 champions are packed with interesting nuances. Seris is an incredibly ominous character and her charm bleeds into her soul-snatching attacks and dimension-jumping abilities. Her ultimate literally has her casting her soul core onto the battlefield to drag nearby enemies into a tear in reality and it screams of personality. The explanation for her character may be limited to a page of text on her champion screen (as not every developer can afford Blizzard’s expensive-looking animated shorts), but her presence on the battlefield speaks volumes. Not only are these small details present in each character's appearance, but their gameplay styles artistically offer enough variety to make switching to a new character a brand-new experience. It’s a similar story with rest of the cast. Bomb King is a living bomb that can throw stackable explosives and his stun bomb that’s modeled after his own character compliments his clever design. Even though Inara and Terminus both hail from the same mysterious living-stone race, their play styles couldn’t be any more different. Inara is all about damage reduction and status changing effects with abilities like her Warder’s Field that dramatically slows down any enemy that draws near, while Terminus has a huge focus on melee combat. Not every character hits the target; Vivian’s generic design doesn’t offer any hints of an interesting backstory and her uninspired and boring Light Machine Gun moveset is a small nitpick in a sea of wonderful characters. Paladins’ wide range of champions fits elegantly within the four classes. Having a front-line champion like the technology-obsessed Torvald is great for capturing the main objective, and the celestial monk Jenos can use his support status to make sure the tank never goes down. Damage champions like the dragon Drogoz can use his rockets to apply pressure, and flanking champions like Skye can stealthily cast out enemies with her poison bolts. What’s beautiful is that champions like the electrifying shaman Grohk blur the lines between support and damage while the front-line pyromaniac Fernando can still do excellent work as a flank. The true depth to Paladins lies underneath. “ That’s all on the surface, but the true depth to Paladins lies underneath. Unlike most hero games, here you’re not completely pigeonholed into a specific role by your choice of character because you can customize them so heavily. Every player picks five out of 16 cards to create a preset loadout tailored to the champion you choose that enhances stats and moves during a match. Say you gave the eccentric Moji and her two-headed companion a card that heals her whenever she uses her Magic Barrier, but after a few matches you notice that using Bon Appetit, her ultimate attack that transforms an enemy into an easy to kill snack, is of more importance. Rather than scrapping the whole build and starting over, you can assign 15 upgrade points any way you like, letting you decide to improve either the healing power of Magic Barrier or the charge rate for the ultimate. Experimental loadouts like these are Paladins’ most important feature, and you’ll likely find yourself constantly going back to tweak and improve your card decks. Furthermore, being able to pick from multiple loadouts at the start of a match allows you to adapt to different team compositions and maps, providing a greater sense of control.Beyond that, every match begins with yet another set of options, allowing you to pick one out of four champion-specific Talents that will dramatically change the way that character plays. Cassie, for instance, is a damage champion who wields a crossbow and generally works great from a farther distance, but this can all swiftly change with the swap of a Talent. For a match where the central point looks to be hectic, it might make sense to pick her Talent that increases damage output based on distance. Does the other team have a few flanks that need to be stopped? Focusing a card deck and Talent on her Dodge Roll ability can switch her sniper archetype to one where mobility reigns supreme. Alternatively, the humanoid tree Grover is a support healer by default, but applying his Ferocity Talent greatly increases the damage of his axe throws and aligns him closer to a damage champion. Maybe their sniper Strix keeps using his stealth ability to turn invisible and escape. Cards and Talents are picked and locked in at the start of each match, but Paladins continues to let customization dominate the playing field even when the action is in full swing. Credits earned throughout a battle let you buy items to further boost stats and influence your abilities. Perhaps you underestimated the healing power of the other team’s Mal’Damba, or maybe their sniper Strix keeps using his stealth ability to turn invisible and escape. Being able to counter that with the healing-reducing Cauterize or the invisibility-revealing Illuminate is an intelligent design choice to keep the team dynamics evolving as the match progresses. Paladins is constantly asking you to pay attention and adapt, even when you think you’ve mastered a champion. Siege is Paladins’ main mode, where teams work to capture the central point and then lead a payload to the end of the map. This mode works well because it constantly promotes teamwork, whether it’s using Ash’s shield to help move players onto the point or having Inara deploy a rock wall to keep enemies from stepping near the payload. Saving your ultimate attacks and using them at the same time is a common strategy but it’s only beneficial if team members communicate. The Onslaught mode, which sees players capturing a single point the entire match, and the Team Deathmatch mode are nice detours, but neither offer anything substantial. Team Deathmatch, in particular, feels a bit thrown together as the instant spawn times don’t allow you time to properly evaluate and buy items like you would between deaths in Siege and Onslaught.Each mode is able to stay fresh and interesting thanks to the 16 maps that are tactically compatible with their assigned game mode. Ascension Peak is an immaculate mountaintop temple filled with ancient trinkets and features interesting flank routes for Seige. The Magistrate's Archives is a great Onslaught map that adds a top and bottom floor for two levels of fighting, an element missing from most of the other stages. Some maps, like the ancient ruins of Jaguar Falls, are aesthetically bland, but none of them fail to provide a different approach for the mode being played.There are a few odd bugs and graphical problems that appear from time to time. Sometimes weapons like Makoa’s anchor or Torvald’s energy beam will stretch out across the entire map or a HUD overlay that should have disappeared will stay longer than needed. At one point the menu background disappeared and left behind a mess of inverted colors, but it was more of an annoyance than anything that affected gameplay. As a free-to-play game, it’s always a concern that microtransactions could cause a feeling of unfairness, but Paladins keeps things on the level by not offering any competitive advantage for sale. Gold currency is earned by playing matches and completing quests, and using it to buy locked champions gives you a decent window of time to master a character as you save up for the next purchase. Of course, the entire selection of characters is available for purchase in a pack, and many cool outfits and other cosmetics can be purchased individually so you’re not left waiting for the item you want to drop from a loot box – though you can buy a loot box for a cheaper price if you don’t mind sifting through a handful of emotes and sprays. That’s fine, but it’s disappointing that some of the most impressive outfits can’t be purchased outright and are locked behind a chest. The Battle Pass runs you 500 crystals ($10, more or less) and is a nice way to continue unlocking skins and chests, but it’s concerning that challenges are not yet available. Verdict: Working on top of the strong and fairly balanced foundation of a free-to-play hero shooter, Paladins’ capacity for experimentation is its greatest strength. Even after over 300 hours of exhilarating battles and strategic planning, champions continue to find a way to offer new gameplay experiences. Whether it’s the main mode that encapsulates the teamwork aspect or the character designs that immediately flow with creativity, Paladins: Champions of the Realm clearly stands out in the midst of competition.
  5. Thx Man

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      Go Talk To Manager To See IP I Think Your name And PW Is Stole contact managers to Change your pw 

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  6. Sorry For this Comment You Say Bad Words In Eypat Language I Know this language
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    [Review] Fallout 4

    Most of the way this huge roleplaying-shooter game works is carried over from its excellent predecessors, Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas. It is the Skyrim to Fallout 3’s Oblivion, if you will – it iterates on the previous game’s already amazing systems, and it’s similarly dense with locations to explore, genuinely creepy monsters to fight, and superbly engrossing post-nuclear atmosphere that blends unsettling gore and death with dark comedy. After more than 55 hours played I may have seen an ending, yet I feel like I’ve only begun to explore its extraordinary world; from the look of it, I’ll easily be able to spend another 100 happy hours here and still see new and exciting things.A story that begins as a basic search for your lost family evolves into something much more complex and morally nuanced. Like in Fallout: New Vegas, we’re drawn into a struggle between several groups competing for control of the region, and deciding which of their imperfect post-apocalyptic philosophies to align with made me pause to consider how I wanted events to play out. Even the highly questionable Institute has a tempting reason to side with them, and turning away from them in my playthrough wasn’t as clear-cut a choice as I’d expected. I was impressed by the sympathy shown toward the villains, too - even the most irredeemable murderer is explored and given a trace of humanity. Mega(Bos)ton The main story isn’t nearly as gripping an attraction as the huge number of well-written side quests. Of course, as is the tradition with developer Bethesda Game Studios’ open-world RPGs, the main story isn’t nearly as gripping an attraction as the huge number of well-written side quests you’ll come across just by wandering through the ruins of the Boston area, now known as The Commonwealth. I found it difficult to complete even the most basic point-A-to-point-B task without being sidetracked at least twice by enticing detours. An abandoned comic book publisher office? How can I not explore it? Boston’s famous Fenway Park? Gotta see what’s become of that. A crumbling high school with heads on pikes outside? I bet there’s great loot in there! Practically tripping over new discoveries like this, I feel like a kid on Easter whose parents are bad at hiding the candy.Attention to detail is evident everywhere. Exploration has its own rewards, as this is the most diverse Fallout world yet, with dilapidated urban areas, ominous dead forests, eerie swamps, a desolate area mired in a hellish radioactive haze, and even some areas that look borderline hospitable like beaches and budding farms. The Commonwealth’s much more color-saturated than Fallout 3’s Capital Wasteland, though it has its fair share of grays and browns, and it shares New Vegas’ bright blue sky (as opposed to oppressive clouds) when it’s not night time or raining or green with a terrifying radiation storm. It’s often beautiful. Attention to detail is evident everywhere – Fallout 4 might not be a leader in all areas of graphics technology (character animations are still a weakness) but from the intricate Pip-Boy wrist-computer interface (which completely changes when you’re in power armor), to careful arrangement of skeletal remains that tell the tragically dark or tragically funny stories of long-dead characters, to tattered poster art on the walls, to even raindrops on your visor (if you’re wearing one) it’s consistently impressive. Over Powered:- Perhaps because this adventure is such a long haul, Fallout 4 is a bit overeager to hook us in the beginning. After a brief glimpse of pre-war life in Fallout’s familiar-but-strange near-future and a retelling of the events on the day the bombs fell in 2077, we barely have time to get our hands dirty in the post-apocalyptic era before Fallout 4 throws us into a big action moment: You’re given a suit of the big, stompy power armor and a heavy weapon, and put into an intense brawl against the series’ most iconic monster. Above: Vault IGN discusses the first things we'll do in Fallout 4.It’s certainly not an unconventional idea for a game with a long progression arc to give us an early taste of the powerful toys we’ll gain access to later in order to motivate us to work for them, but with Fallout it’s a misstep that trods on the series’ beloved feeling of working our way up from almost nothing to become the dominant force in the wasteland. This bothered me less and less as I began to explore, but knowing that armor was available when I wanted it made me a little cockier than I wanted to be when setting out into a hostile, unforgiving world. impact. “ One of the first things a returning Fallout player will notice after creating a character with the intuitive push-and-pull face-sculpting tool is that the entire concepts of skill points and traits have been consumed by the perks system, unifying all character progression under one big, elaborately animated Vault Boy chart with so many unlockable options you have to scroll through them to see them all. While this streamlining does mean giving up a lot of minute control over where your character improves with each level, it also means the decision of what to do with the single point you get each level has a significant impact, and therefore those decisions represent a commitment and are tough to make: do you want to spend it on a new low-level perk, increase the level of an existing one, or pump it into a SPECIAL attribute like Luck to boost certain stats and also open up a new, more powerful perk, like the Mysterious Stranger, that you’ll be able to unlock with your next level?These might be more general, jack-of-all-trades types than previous Fallout character builds, in that you generally don’t have any crippling deficiencies, but they definitely have their distinguishing features that’ll make one playthrough feel different from the next. And before you lament it as a “dumbing down” of Fallout’s overall complexity, turn your eye to the new crafting and equipment progression system, which has picked up the slack by becoming vastly more complicated and interesting. “ As if I didn’t already have enough of a hoarding problem, Fallout 4’s crafting system gives even more motivation to compulsively collect everything that isn’t nailed down. It’s so easy, too - grabbing things out of containers happens quickly in window that pops up when you look over it. Every item in the world is made up of material components, most of which you can intuitively guess: bottles are needed for glass, a desk fan will provide you with steel and gears, and a roll of duct tape is worth its weight in gold. I once went on a desperate search for pencils so that I could extract the lead they contained to use for radiation shielding. (Apparently Fallout's alternate universe never switched to graphite.) Nothing is worthless junk, which means that managing the weight of your inventory is a constant series of agonizing decisions of what to take with you and what to leave behind.The value of those materials comes from their use in the fantastic equipment upgrades, which give most guns you pick up extraordinary potential for flexibility and longevity. Stopping at a crafting bench with the right components in hand can turn a pistol into a short-range, pray-and-spray automatic or a scoped sniper with a long barrel for accuracy and a big stock to reduce recoil. A few tweaks to a standard-issue laser rifle can add burning damage over time, or split the beam into a shotgun-like spread. The best part is that those changes aren’t just tweaked numbers in the stats; nearly every modification you make is reflected in the look of your gun as well, creating an extremely varied selection of weapons both for you and for enemies. Post-Apoca-Chic Likewise, the new armor system lets you piece together six chunks of gear - helmet, chest plate, and each individual arm and leg - on top of your clothes to form cobbled-together, asymmetrical outfits that feel like exactly what someone who assembled their wardrobe by scavenging the wasteland should wear. The suit my character wears now has at least one piece from each major faction, reflecting both his allegiances and his victories over foes. And of course, armor can be upgraded using collected materials as well, though it sadly doesn’t have as dramatic a cosmetic effect as with weapons. The armor system suffers from some inconsistency: several times I was a little bit heartbroken to find a new outfit like a tuxedo or a Halloween costume, but couldn’t use them as the foundation of a new custom-built look. Only certain jumpsuits can have pauldrons and shin guards strapped onto them, it seems, and no distinction is made in the item description. FALLOUT 4 Fallout 4 Review We’re giving this post-nuclear RPG a glowing endorsement. 5:32 By Dan Stapleton Updated: 1 May 2017 9:33 pm Posted: 9 Nov 2015 5:58 pm Most of the way this huge roleplaying-shooter game works is carried over from its excellent predecessors, Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas. It is the Skyrim to Fallout 3’s Oblivion, if you will – it iterates on the previous game’s already amazing systems, and it’s similarly dense with locations to explore, genuinely creepy monsters to fight, and superbly engrossing post-nuclear atmosphere that blends unsettling gore and death with dark comedy. After more than 55 hours played I may have seen an ending, yet I feel like I’ve only begun to explore its extraordinary world; from the look of it, I’ll easily be able to spend another 100 happy hours here and still see new and exciting things. Watch the first 20 minutes of Fallout 4 SEE DEAL above.A story that begins as a basic search for your lost family evolves into something much more complex and morally nuanced. Like in Fallout: New Vegas, we’re drawn into a struggle between several groups competing for control of the region, and deciding which of their imperfect post-apocalyptic philosophies to align with made me pause to consider how I wanted events to play out. Even the highly questionable Institute has a tempting reason to side with them, and turning away from them in my playthrough wasn’t as clear-cut a choice as I’d expected. I was impressed by the sympathy shown toward the villains, too - even the most irredeemable murderer is explored and given a trace of humanity. Mega(Bos)ton The main story isn’t nearly as gripping an attraction as the huge number of well-written side quests. “ Of course, as is the tradition with developer Bethesda Game Studios’ open-world RPGs, the main story isn’t nearly as gripping an attraction as the huge number of well-written side quests you’ll come across just by wandering through the ruins of the Boston area, now known as The Commonwealth. I found it difficult to complete even the most basic point-A-to-point-B task without being sidetracked at least twice by enticing detours. An abandoned comic book publisher office? How can I not explore it? Boston’s famous Fenway Park? Gotta see what’s become of that. A crumbling high school with heads on pikes outside? I bet there’s great loot in there! Practically tripping over new discoveries like this, I feel like a kid on Easter whose parents are bad at hiding the candy. Watch a 24-hour time lapse above. Attention to detail is evident everywhere. “ Exploration has its own rewards, as this is the most diverse Fallout world yet, with dilapidated urban areas, ominous dead forests, eerie swamps, a desolate area mired in a hellish radioactive haze, and even some areas that look borderline hospitable like beaches and budding farms. The Commonwealth’s much more color-saturated than Fallout 3’s Capital Wasteland, though it has its fair share of grays and browns, and it shares New Vegas’ bright blue sky (as opposed to oppressive clouds) when it’s not night time or raining or green with a terrifying radiation storm. It’s often beautiful. Attention to detail is evident everywhere – Fallout 4 might not be a leader in all areas of graphics technology (character animations are still a weakness) but from the intricate Pip-Boy wrist-computer interface (which completely changes when you’re in power armor), to careful arrangement of skeletal remains that tell the tragically dark or tragically funny stories of long-dead characters, to tattered poster art on the walls, to even raindrops on your visor (if you’re wearing one) it’s consistently impressive. Over Powered Perhaps because this adventure is such a long haul, Fallout 4 is a bit overeager to hook us in the beginning. After a brief glimpse of pre-war life in Fallout’s familiar-but-strange near-future and a retelling of the events on the day the bombs fell in 2077, we barely have time to get our hands dirty in the post-apocalyptic era before Fallout 4 throws us into a big action moment: You’re given a suit of the big, stompy power armor and a heavy weapon, and put into an intense brawl against the series’ most iconic monster. Above: Vault IGN discusses the first things we'll do in Fallout 4. It’s certainly not an unconventional idea for a game with a long progression arc to give us an early taste of the powerful toys we’ll gain access to later in order to motivate us to work for them, but with Fallout it’s a misstep that trods on the series’ beloved feeling of working our way up from almost nothing to become the dominant force in the wasteland. This bothered me less and less as I began to explore, but knowing that armor was available when I wanted it made me a little cockier than I wanted to be when setting out into a hostile, unforgiving world. It Builds Character The decision of what to do with the single point you get each level has a significant impact. “ One of the first things a returning Fallout player will notice after creating a character with the intuitive push-and-pull face-sculpting tool is that the entire concepts of skill points and traits have been consumed by the perks system, unifying all character progression under one big, elaborately animated Vault Boy chart with so many unlockable options you have to scroll through them to see them all. While this streamlining does mean giving up a lot of minute control over where your character improves with each level, it also means the decision of what to do with the single point you get each level has a significant impact, and therefore those decisions represent a commitment and are tough to make: do you want to spend it on a new low-level perk, increase the level of an existing one, or pump it into a SPECIAL attribute like Luck to boost certain stats and also open up a new, more powerful perk, like the Mysterious Stranger, that you’ll be able to unlock with your next level? Watch the Fallout 4 Launch Trailer above. These might be more general, jack-of-all-trades types than previous Fallout character builds, in that you generally don’t have any crippling deficiencies, but they definitely have their distinguishing features that’ll make one playthrough feel different from the next. And before you lament it as a “dumbing down” of Fallout’s overall complexity, turn your eye to the new crafting and equipment progression system, which has picked up the slack by becoming vastly more complicated and interesting. One Man’s Trash Fallout 4’s crafting system gives even more motivation to compulsively collect everything that isn’t nailed down. “ As if I didn’t already have enough of a hoarding problem, Fallout 4’s crafting system gives even more motivation to compulsively collect everything that isn’t nailed down. It’s so easy, too - grabbing things out of containers happens quickly in window that pops up when you look over it. Every item in the world is made up of material components, most of which you can intuitively guess: bottles are needed for glass, a desk fan will provide you with steel and gears, and a roll of duct tape is worth its weight in gold. I once went on a desperate search for pencils so that I could extract the lead they contained to use for radiation shielding. (Apparently Fallout's alternate universe never switched to graphite.) Nothing is worthless junk, which means that managing the weight of your inventory is a constant series of agonizing decisions of what to take with you and what to leave behind. Fallout in 5 Minutes 6:18 Above: Catch up on the Fallout universe in (a little over) 5 minutes. Nearly every modification you make is reflected in the look of your gun. “ The value of those materials comes from their use in the fantastic equipment upgrades, which give most guns you pick up extraordinary potential for flexibility and longevity. Stopping at a crafting bench with the right components in hand can turn a pistol into a short-range, pray-and-spray automatic or a scoped sniper with a long barrel for accuracy and a big stock to reduce recoil. A few tweaks to a standard-issue laser rifle can add burning damage over time, or split the beam into a shotgun-like spread. The best part is that those changes aren’t just tweaked numbers in the stats; nearly every modification you make is reflected in the look of your gun as well, creating an extremely varied selection of weapons both for you and for enemies. Post-Apoca-Chic Likewise, the new armor system lets you piece together six chunks of gear - helmet, chest plate, and each individual arm and leg - on top of your clothes to form cobbled-together, asymmetrical outfits that feel like exactly what someone who assembled their wardrobe by scavenging the wasteland should wear. The suit my character wears now has at least one piece from each major faction, reflecting both his allegiances and his victories over foes. And of course, armor can be upgraded using collected materials as well, though it sadly doesn’t have as dramatic a cosmetic effect as with weapons. The armor system suffers from some inconsistency: several times I was a little bit heartbroken to find a new outfit like a tuxedo or a Halloween costume, but couldn’t use them as the foundation of a new custom-built look. Only certain jumpsuits can have pauldrons and shin guards strapped onto them, it seems, and no distinction is made in the item description. If you buy something through this post, IGN may get a share of the sale. For more, learn more. Another major change to personal protection is that Fallout’s distinctive power armor behaves almost like a walking tank that you climb into and out of (with a great Iron Man-style animation as it closes around you) instead of wearing like clothes, and its fuel is a limited resource you have to find in the world. It’s a bold design move that makes these hulks’ appearance on the battlefield feel like a big event. However, since it’s always just a fast-travel away, in practice, having to run and grab it when the going got tough became more of an inconvenience than anything - two loading screens between you and resuming the fight. It also forces you to use fast-travel to conserve fuel, which would mess with a no-fast-travel play style. But I do love how every piece of the armor can be individually damaged, repaired, upgraded, customized, or even swapped out for other models. Watch us unbox the Limited Pip-Boy Edition above. All those upgrades are a great way to keep a favorite piece of gear useful long after its original weak stats would’ve led you to sell it off to a junk dealer for a handful of caps. Letting you name those items yourself is a great touch, too - I have fond memories of my adventures with my trusty long double-barrel shotgun, Ol’ Shooty.On top of that, loot has been punched up in a very Diablo-style way: even better than the typical spoils of battle and foraging, every so often you’ll come across a Legendary enemy who will drop a uniquely named special weapon or item with a modifier. You might get a pistol that refreshes your action points when executing a critical hit, an arm piece that makes lockpicking easier, a flamethrower that deals extra radiation damage, or any of dozens of others. I found it difficult to part with these - they’re so full of potential, and I found I changed my playstyle to take advantage of the bonuses they offer, and sacrificing superior protection to keep them. And of course, all of these items are just as customizable as anything else (except you can’t break them down for parts). A Straight Shooter Even small changes to gun stats are important, because Fallout 4’s FALLOUT 4 Fallout 4 Review We’re giving this post-nuclear RPG a glowing endorsement. 5:32 By Dan Stapleton Updated: 1 May 2017 9:33 pm Posted: 9 Nov 2015 5:58 pm Most of the way this huge roleplaying-shooter game works is carried over from its excellent predecessors, Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas. It is the Skyrim to Fallout 3’s Oblivion, if you will – it iterates on the previous game’s already amazing systems, and it’s similarly dense with locations to explore, genuinely creepy monsters to fight, and superbly engrossing post-nuclear atmosphere that blends unsettling gore and death with dark comedy. After more than 55 hours played I may have seen an ending, yet I feel like I’ve only begun to explore its extraordinary world; from the look of it, I’ll easily be able to spend another 100 happy hours here and still see new and exciting things. Watch the first 20 minutes of Fallout 4 SEE DEAL above.A story that begins as a basic search for your lost family evolves into something much more complex and morally nuanced. Like in Fallout: New Vegas, we’re drawn into a struggle between several groups competing for control of the region, and deciding which of their imperfect post-apocalyptic philosophies to align with made me pause to consider how I wanted events to play out. Even the highly questionable Institute has a tempting reason to side with them, and turning away from them in my playthrough wasn’t as clear-cut a choice as I’d expected. I was impressed by the sympathy shown toward the villains, too - even the most irredeemable murderer is explored and given a trace of humanity. Mega(Bos)ton The main story isn’t nearly as gripping an attraction as the huge number of well-written side quests. “ Of course, as is the tradition with developer Bethesda Game Studios’ open-world RPGs, the main story isn’t nearly as gripping an attraction as the huge number of well-written side quests you’ll come across just by wandering through the ruins of the Boston area, now known as The Commonwealth. I found it difficult to complete even the most basic point-A-to-point-B task without being sidetracked at least twice by enticing detours. An abandoned comic book publisher office? How can I not explore it? Boston’s famous Fenway Park? Gotta see what’s become of that. A crumbling high school with heads on pikes outside? I bet there’s great loot in there! Practically tripping over new discoveries like this, I feel like a kid on Easter whose parents are bad at hiding the candy. Watch a 24-hour time lapse above. Attention to detail is evident everywhere. “ Exploration has its own rewards, as this is the most diverse Fallout world yet, with dilapidated urban areas, ominous dead forests, eerie swamps, a desolate area mired in a hellish radioactive haze, and even some areas that look borderline hospitable like beaches and budding farms. The Commonwealth’s much more color-saturated than Fallout 3’s Capital Wasteland, though it has its fair share of grays and browns, and it shares New Vegas’ bright blue sky (as opposed to oppressive clouds) when it’s not night time or raining or green with a terrifying radiation storm. It’s often beautiful. Attention to detail is evident everywhere – Fallout 4 might not be a leader in all areas of graphics technology (character animations are still a weakness) but from the intricate Pip-Boy wrist-computer interface (which completely changes when you’re in power armor), to careful arrangement of skeletal remains that tell the tragically dark or tragically funny stories of long-dead characters, to tattered poster art on the walls, to even raindrops on your visor (if you’re wearing one) it’s consistently impressive. Over Powered Perhaps because this adventure is such a long haul, Fallout 4 is a bit overeager to hook us in the beginning. After a brief glimpse of pre-war life in Fallout’s familiar-but-strange near-future and a retelling of the events on the day the bombs fell in 2077, we barely have time to get our hands dirty in the post-apocalyptic era before Fallout 4 throws us into a big action moment: You’re given a suit of the big, stompy power armor and a heavy weapon, and put into an intense brawl against the series’ most iconic monster. Above: Vault IGN discusses the first things we'll do in Fallout 4. It’s certainly not an unconventional idea for a game with a long progression arc to give us an early taste of the powerful toys we’ll gain access to later in order to motivate us to work for them, but with Fallout it’s a misstep that trods on the series’ beloved feeling of working our way up from almost nothing to become the dominant force in the wasteland. This bothered me less and less as I began to explore, but knowing that armor was available when I wanted it made me a little cockier than I wanted to be when setting out into a hostile, unforgiving world. It Builds Character The decision of what to do with the single point you get each level has a significant impact. “ One of the first things a returning Fallout player will notice after creating a character with the intuitive push-and-pull face-sculpting tool is that the entire concepts of skill points and traits have been consumed by the perks system, unifying all character progression under one big, elaborately animated Vault Boy chart with so many unlockable options you have to scroll through them to see them all. While this streamlining does mean giving up a lot of minute control over where your character improves with each level, it also means the decision of what to do with the single point you get each level has a significant impact, and therefore those decisions represent a commitment and are tough to make: do you want to spend it on a new low-level perk, increase the level of an existing one, or pump it into a SPECIAL attribute like Luck to boost certain stats and also open up a new, more powerful perk, like the Mysterious Stranger, that you’ll be able to unlock with your next level? Watch the Fallout 4 Launch Trailer above. These might be more general, jack-of-all-trades types than previous Fallout character builds, in that you generally don’t have any crippling deficiencies, but they definitely have their distinguishing features that’ll make one playthrough feel different from the next. And before you lament it as a “dumbing down” of Fallout’s overall complexity, turn your eye to the new crafting and equipment progression system, which has picked up the slack by becoming vastly more complicated and interesting. One Man’s Trash Fallout 4’s crafting system gives even more motivation to compulsively collect everything that isn’t nailed down. “ As if I didn’t already have enough of a hoarding problem, Fallout 4’s crafting system gives even more motivation to compulsively collect everything that isn’t nailed down. It’s so easy, too - grabbing things out of containers happens quickly in window that pops up when you look over it. Every item in the world is made up of material components, most of which you can intuitively guess: bottles are needed for glass, a desk fan will provide you with steel and gears, and a roll of duct tape is worth its weight in gold. I once went on a desperate search for pencils so that I could extract the lead they contained to use for radiation shielding. (Apparently Fallout's alternate universe never switched to graphite.) Nothing is worthless junk, which means that managing the weight of your inventory is a constant series of agonizing decisions of what to take with you and what to leave behind. Above: Catch up on the Fallout universe in (a little over) 5 minutes. Nearly every modification you make is reflected in the look of your gun. “ The value of those materials comes from their use in the fantastic equipment upgrades, which give most guns you pick up extraordinary potential for flexibility and longevity. Stopping at a crafting bench with the right components in hand can turn a pistol into a short-range, pray-and-spray automatic or a scoped sniper with a long barrel for accuracy and a big stock to reduce recoil. A few tweaks to a standard-issue laser rifle can add burning damage over time, or split the beam into a shotgun-like spread. The best part is that those changes aren’t just tweaked numbers in the stats; nearly every modification you make is reflected in the look of your gun as well, creating an extremely varied selection of weapons both for you and for enemies. Post-Apoca-Chic Likewise, the new armor system lets you piece together six chunks of gear - helmet, chest plate, and each individual arm and leg - on top of your clothes to form cobbled-together, asymmetrical outfits that feel like exactly what someone who assembled their wardrobe by scavenging the wasteland should wear. The suit my character wears now has at least one piece from each major faction, reflecting both his allegiances and his victories over foes. And of course, armor can be upgraded using collected materials as well, though it sadly doesn’t have as dramatic a cosmetic effect as with weapons. The armor system suffers from some inconsistency: several times I was a little bit heartbroken to find a new outfit like a tuxedo or a Halloween costume, but couldn’t use them as the foundation of a new custom-built look. Only certain jumpsuits can have pauldrons and shin guards strapped onto them, it seems, and no distinction is made in the item description. If you buy something through this post, IGN may get a share of the sale. For more, learn more. Another major change to personal protection is that Fallout’s distinctive power armor behaves almost like a walking tank that you climb into and out of (with a great Iron Man-style animation as it closes around you) instead of wearing like clothes, and its fuel is a limited resource you have to find in the world. It’s a bold design move that makes these hulks’ appearance on the battlefield feel like a big event. However, since it’s always just a fast-travel away, in practice, having to run and grab it when the going got tough became more of an inconvenience than anything - two loading screens between you and resuming the fight. It also forces you to use fast-travel to conserve fuel, which would mess with a no-fast-travel play style. But I do love how every piece of the armor can be individually damaged, repaired, upgraded, customized, or even swapped out for other models. Unboxing Fallout 4's Super Limited Pip-Boy Edition 4:45 Watch us unbox the Limited Pip-Boy Edition above. All those upgrades are a great way to keep a favorite piece of gear useful long after its original weak stats would’ve led you to sell it off to a junk dealer for a handful of caps. Letting you name those items yourself is a great touch, too - I have fond memories of my adventures with my trusty long double-barrel shotgun, Ol’ Shooty.I changed my playstyle to take advantage of the bonuses Legendary items offer. “ On top of that, loot has been punched up in a very Diablo-style way: even better than the typical spoils of battle and foraging, every so often you’ll come across a Legendary enemy who will drop a uniquely named special weapon or item with a modifier. You might get a pistol that refreshes your action points when executing a critical hit, an arm piece that makes lockpicking easier, a flamethrower that deals extra radiation damage, or any of dozens of others. I found it difficult to part with these - they’re so full of potential, and I found I changed my playstyle to take advantage of the bonuses they offer, and sacrificing superior protection to keep them. And of course, all of these items are just as customizable as anything else (except you can’t break them down for parts). A Straight Shooter Even small changes to gun stats are important, because Fallout 4’s gunplay feels more like a typical good-quality first-person shooter than the series ever has before, so skilled aim is important to the point where you could comfortably avoid the pause-and-plan Vault-Tec-Assisted Targeting System (VATS) button if you wanted to. The interface even allows you to create shortcuts on the D-pad or number keys, so you can access stimpacks and other healing or performance-enhancing drugs and items without pausing the action to go into your inventory. But I didn’t want to, because planning and watching those slow-motion dismembering kills play out is still a great reward for a job well done. disappointing, but Fallout 4 also doesn’t make the mistake of putting a hard stop to it after the final battle – it’s left open for further questing, as is the level cap. That’s a tradeoff. Verdict The world, exploration, crafting, atmosphere, and story of Fallout 4 are all key parts of this hugely successful sandbox role-playing game. Great new reasons to obsessively gather and hoard relics of happier times, strong companions, and sympathetic villains driving tough decisions make it an adventure I’ll definitely replay and revisit. Even the technical shakiness that crops up here and there can’t even begin to slow down its momentum.
  9. Congrats Jani 🙂

  10. A game that's optimized for the uncivilized.roquois nation spreads across the world quickly, being likened to plague by my enemies. In real life, this relatively small group of people was all but wiped out by the end of the 20th century, but in my game, they are a force to be reckoned with -- a nation wresting control of the seas with modern navies, and taking cities by force with infantry and tanks. Manifest Destiny takes on a whole new meaning; by 2010, I've slowly but surely conquered the Americans and other European nations, subduing them to my rule... or simply burning their once-haughty nations to ashes.It's a turn-based strategy game based around building up a selected society into a world power. And, yes, Civilization V can look seriously boring to the casual bystander, but for the person at the helm of the game each turn can lead to a weighty decision, giving the player a certain feeling of power that few, if any, games match. Civilization has no campaign, instead it simply allows the players to create a world of their devising and jump right into it either by themselves or with others in multiplayer. The biggest choice a player will make is what civilization they're going to play. Each civilization is led by a great leader from history, and gets a few special benefits and units, so its' important to consider what type of victory you're out to achieve before setting your nationality. For instance the French get cultural bonuses that give them a huge bonus towards a cultural victory, while playing Germany will give players access to powerful military units like the Panzer tank that can aid in taking over the world by force. Of course you can always pick a military-focused leader and take them on a route towards a cultural victory, but this will also present a greater challenge. Besides picking a nation, players can further customize their scenario by switching between options such as whether the world will be made of several continents or not, what era they start in (Civ moves in eras, such as Medieval, Renaissance, etc., which also influences the level of technology you have access to), and how many other civilizations they wish to compete with. It essentially makes for infinite replayability, giving players a simple tool set to craft the challenge they want in of the world over and over again. And hell yes, this is the type of game that you want to just play over and over. Like its predecessors, Civilization V is amazingly addictive, with games commonly drawing more than five or six hours out of me in a single sitting. The reason? Because win or lose, Civilization V allows players to guide an entire society and craft their own story, taking them from the dawn of history and far into the future. I love taking the Japanese and making them into a peaceful country who wants nothing more than to make Opera houses and win over their neighbors via their culture, or take the Aztecs and fashion them into a powerful imperialistic nation that is completely fascist and obsessed with world domination. Civilization V really is what you make of it, and for me it's a good way to tell alternate stories about some of history's most interesting nations. I say Civilization V is only "good" -- and not "great," as I would have said about Civilization IV -- at crafting stories because I feel like the game's taken away some pretty important tools for customizing your society. In Civilization IV players could force things on their country and opposing nations in the form of religions and government. In Civilization V, though, players gather up "culture" as a resource, spending it every so many turns on "policies" that give their civilization bonuses. For instance a player might choose to put policy points into the "Piety" tree, giving their nation a boost to happiness and forcing them to accept an unnamed religion. I really appreciate the way the various policy trees give players a wide array of customization options for their nation, but I miss the power and ridiculous glee I got out doing things like forcing Judaism down the throats of my enemies because my Jewish Japanese empire was out to win owning the hearts and minds of my neighbors. GameSpot may get a commission from retail offers. Strategy fanatics have lost hundreds of hours of their lives to Sid Meier's beguiling creations over the years, and they should prepare to lose hundreds more. Civilization V is yet another glistening example of turn-based bliss that will keep you up long past your bedtime. It exercises its power over your mind using many of the tricks the series has long been known for: varied ways of accomplishing your goal of world domination, the thrill of expanding a paltry city into a bustling empire, and the suspense of venturing into unknown territory. The latest Civilization game takes those basics and layers onto them new features that make moment-to-moment gameplay feel more dynamic than in the past. Most noticeably, the square grids of previous Civilization games have been jettisoned in favor of hexagons that nicely accommodate the other most consequential transformations: Military units can no longer be stacked, and ranged units can fire from multiple tiles away. The tactical combat that rises from these modifications is a lot of fun and makes warfare a lot more exciting than in Civ games of yore. AI quirks and a few other minor issues become apparent the more you play, but these are wholly forgivable foibles in an attractive and sophisticated game that constantly begs you to remain at your keyboard for just one more turn. First, here is a quick primer for newcomers. Civilization V, like previous games in the series, is about leading a nation through the eras of history, starting with a single city and expanding across the map. At the outset of any given game, you select a leader (in this case, one of 18, or 19 if you purchased the special edition from Steam), each of whom possesses a particular benefit that disposes his or her civilization to a particular style of play. Americans get a range of sight bonus; the Siamese get diplomatic bonuses with miniature nations new to the series called city-states; the English get naval perks; and so forth. From here, you collect resources; make deals with other civilizations; manage your economy; and go to war and attack the cities of your enemies when the time is right. There are four main ways to win a typically lengthy game of Civilization V. You could dominate through military means and defeat every civilization's capital city. You could be the first to gun through the technology tree and build the parts necessary for a spaceship that whisks you away to Alpha Centauri. You could ally with nations and city-states across the globe and win a diplomatic victory via a vote at the United Nations. Or you might become the cultural envy of the world by developing a large number of government policies and researching a mysterious undertaking known as the Utopia Project. There is also a fifth victory condition: possess the highest score when the turn limit has been reached. Whether Civ is new to you or not, it's easy to appreciate the newest game's user-friendly interface, which makes figuring out what to do next a breeze, meaning more of your time is spent strategizing and less of it is spent fumbling around. The organized nested menus are intuitive and easy to get used to, and Civ V does a good job of only displaying vital information on the screen while making other information easily available with just a few clicks. A single action button leads you through every aspect of your turn. If a unit is waiting for orders, the button says so, and clicking it takes you to the unit in question. If it's time to research a new technology, you click the button and it opens the research menu. There are a few aspects of the interface that could have been cleaned up. Switching between a city's production menu and the production queue is needlessly clunky, and the diplomatic overview doesn't label the tiny icons indicating what luxury resources other civilizations are producing. But most of the time, you always have the information you need when you need it, and neophytes should never feel in the dark. been eliminated--most notably, religion and espionage--though many players aren't likely to miss them. However, longtime aspects of the series have returned. Your advisors are there if you need a bit of direction, though unit automation and little icons representing each advisor's suggestion in the production menus mean you won't often need to pay them a visit. The exhaustive Civilopedia is only a click away and offers a wealth of information on every aspect of every feature. You still build wonders like the Egyptian pyramids, the hanging gardens, and the Great Wall, which generate the culture resource and provide other tangible benefits, without coming with the turn-by-turn maintenance cost of standard structures. The culture you gain is spent on social policies, which have replaced the governments of Civilization IV. Each time you reach the cultural resource benchmark, you select from the policy list, which is split into multiple policy types, each of which has its own sub-tree. The benefits you reap are cumulative, and while there are certain balancing restrictions in place, you still get a lot of freedom in how you want to progress. The mid- and late-game flexibility make it an excellent addition to the franchise. The first change you'll notice, however, has even more impact on Civilization V: The map is divided into hexagons rather than squares. The move to hexagons sets the stage for Civilization V's tactical combat. In the past, you could stack units into one army of doom (or a few armies) that rolled across the map. Now, with the exception of special units (the great general, for example) and workers, units cannot occupy the same space. As a result, you must be extremely conscious of each unit's weaknesses and strengths; a unit's position in regards to both its enemies and other friendly units; and whether or not any terrain bonuses apply. There is a rock-paper-scissors relationship among units that further deepens as units level up and you progress through the eras. When units level up, you choose one of several upgrades for them, such as an attack bonus when attacking from flat terrain. As they level up further, the possibilities expand, which means healing bonuses for the unit, as well as neighboring units, or greater degrees of the same enhancements. Helpfully, you can also choose to fully heal the unit when it levels at the expense of choosing another bonus, which is a mighty handy ability that can save a veteran unit from the jaws of defeat. This excellent new system layers tactical combat onto the strategic map, making battles much tenser--and much less abstract. It also encourages you to keep your veteran units alive. And while it costs you a bit of gold, you can also upgrade units into more powerful iterations (a trebuchet into a cannon, for example) when your research path allows it. Montezuma knows drama. That sounds complex, but it's extremely simple to keep track of battles in Civilization V. When you hover over your intended victim, you get a quick preview of the likely outcome of battle, though a preview won't tell you of other potential consequences. You might win the battle but move into range of a city's defenses or next to a squad of riflemen prepared to defeat you. In fact, similar points could be made about most of Civilization V: It's complex enough to support all of your schemes, but it's easy to interact with it. Veterans who are into micromanagement and like to plan at a snail's pace can manage every worker's actions, select an automated focus for each city's citizens (gold, culture, and so forth), and control each scout's moves hex by hex. But if you'd rather concentrate on the broader aspects of your strategy, you can leave a lot of these actions to the AI, which does a mostly creditable job of doing the right things at the right time. Nevertheless, you do need to keep an eye on automated processes. Minor civilizations called city-states are one of Civilization V's newer additions. While you need an open-border agreement to pass freely through the territories of other civilizations, you may pass through a neutral city-state's borders without such a treaty, though city-states that aren't friendly to you will take offense at trespassing. Units set to automatically explore will think nothing of passing through neutral territory. The damage to the relationship is small, but it's still an annoyance to get a notification that you've irritated a city-state because your scouts weren't conscious of the borders. A toggle to allow or disallow exploring units to pass through city-state borders would have been a helpful addition. City-states may be partners to that particular pathfinding inconvenience, but they are overall a positive addition to the franchise, if not a dramatic one. You can interact with them, but only in limited ways. By offering them gold or units, you gain favor with them, becoming friends and perhaps allies with them. When friendly, you can move through city-states without consequence; when allies, they will join you in war, where they don't have a lot of impact but can still ease some pressure. Money isn't the only way to increase your standing with city-states. They will make various requests of you--build a road to them from your capital, defeat some barbarians, or take up arms against an enemy city-state, among others. Doing their bidding earns you favor, but it can have other outcomes as well. Genoa may want you to defeat Venice on its behalf, but should another civilization be protecting Venice, you might draw unintended ire. And if you get particularly aggressive, city-states may band together to try to defeat you. Another purpose city-states serve is that they get a vote in the United Nations, making them helpful in winning a diplomatic victory if you work especially hard (and spend huge amounts of coin) to cultivate lasting relationships. If you are seeking this method to victory, you might be tempted early in the game to bring a city-state into your fold, but it's a temptation you should avoid. Your relationships with city-states crumble if you don't maintain them, and gold is too precious early in the game to waste your first 250 coins on a friendship that will dissolve within a few turns. In fact, diplomacy can occasionally feel a bit haphazard because of infrequent but noticeable AI oddities. You might request open borders in one turn and be flatly refused--only to have the same civilization propose the same agreement in the next. A weak nation might attack you and refuse your attempts to call for peace, only to sue for peace and gift you with a nice sum of gold and luxury resources a few turns later. As a rule, competing civilizations seem to favor war over harmony, which makes diplomacy feel a bit hollow. Furthermore, the descriptions of other leaders' moods seen in Civ III and Civ IV have been dropped, so you're not always sure of your standing with another civilization. That isn't to say, however, that diplomacy isn't viable. Focusing on nonmilitary means can still inspire a well-deserved victory. Pushing through eras to win a scientific victory is particularly enjoyable; this is in part due to the well-balanced technology tree, which prevents you from gunning forward willy-nilly from one era to the next. Focusing on technology also has entertainment value, unlocking the game's most powerful future-era unit--the giant death robot. (Nukes are fun; robots are even more fun.) But even if you want cultural or diplomatic victory, you can't ignore the science resource. Structures you need or at the very least should have for other types of victories--the U.N. or the Sydney Opera House, for example--require planning and smart use of the tech tree. But this is the tightly balanced way of the Civilization series: Every action, unit, technology, and structure is tied to everything else. And it's this balancing act, as well as the tweaks and on-the-fly adjustments you need to make, that keeps players so captivated. You will also be captivated by Civilization V's great looks and serene soundtrack. You may or may not miss Civilization IV's glossy global view, but it's hard not to be drawn in by the newer game's sunny visuals. The great leaders of the world are particularly noteworthy. Montezuma announces his arrival from behind a bright flame while wearing an elaborate green headdress. Wu Zetian's porcelain skin, silky garments, and icy glare are just as memorable. Each leader speaks in his or her native language, which is a wonderful touch. Elsewhere, waves lapping against the shores and exaggerated battle animations give flair to the strategic map; even the fluffy clouds indicating unexplored areas have a certain amount of class to them. The soundtrack is equally classy, made up of a wonderful array of understated orchestral tunes. Musical repetition is all too common in slow-paced strategy games. While tunes certainly repeat in Civilization V, the gorgeous and diverse classical mix here, featuring such composers as Dvorak, Mahler, and Grieg, as well as original music utilizing familiar themes, is unlikely to wear out its welcome. In fact, Civilization V is not likely to wear out its welcome in general. Random maps, numerous civilizations, and many other options keep the game fresh time after time. If predictable behavior patterns start to bother you (the aggressiveness of the Aztecs, for example), then you can randomize civilization attitudes. If you tire of the early game, then you can start in a later era. Remove barbarians from the map or set a maximum number of turns, if you prefer. And as in Civilization IV, you can adjust the game speed to accommodate marathon sessions or quicker matches. (Though any given game is measured in hours, not minutes.) User-created mods are also likely to be a big part of Civilization V's future, and it's easy to download mods in the game menus. There are already a few available, including a great one that allows you to play on an array of real-world maps. Social policies are a new, and great, addition to the Civ franchise. Multiplayer games are also a possibility for the most patient players. You can set a turn timer to limit how long players get to consider their next move, but even so, the pace is at the whim of those involved, so matches can get bogged down in the early hours. Luckily, most of the customization options available to you in single-player games are available in multiplayer games as well, so you can keep things moving with the right options activated. Gone are hotseat and e-mail play options, with online and local network play as the only ways to play with others. By nature, Civilization V is a game you enjoy most with friends instead of random strangers, though the simple interface makes it easy to find and join available Internet games. Should you want to limit your game to friends, you must invite them through the Steam overlay. (It's too bad there is no button built into the in-game interface for friend invitations, as it would have been a nice user-friendly touch.) Nonetheless, games tend to move smoothly without any notable lag, though we did run into glitches while playing online. At several points, the action button refused to progress to an end turn prompt, forcing us to open a random menu for the match to continue. At other times, switching from the production menu to the production queue caused certain buttons to become unresponsive. (The random-menu fix was effective here as well.) But those are tiny irritations in a fun and complex game bursting with joy and constant rewards. Sid Meier's Civilization V sucks hour after hour of your day away, giving rise to plans of global conquest and thoughtful tactics. Of course, you could say the same of Civ games of the past, but what makes Civilization V a praiseworthy successor is how it changes up key elements of the franchise. The game's core values--expansion, exploitation, exploration, extermination--are as strong as ever. But the newer tactical combat and addition of city-states give strategy veterans new ways of tackling their goals, while a friendly interface and expansive Civilopedia help newcomers get up to speed relatively quickly. There are a few aspects of Civilization V that could have used a bit more attention, but even as is, this is yet another classic edition to a series that consistently rewards and renovates. If you have even the remotest interest in worldwide domination, you owe it to yourself to get lost in one of the most rewarding turn-based games in years.
  11. Somebody Can Walk Away From Your Life Let Them Walk Away......

    You Shouldn't Have To Convinced Anybody To Love You...

    IF They Can Walk Let Them Go IF The Leave You...

    It Means They Are Not Attached To Your Future 😭

  12. CV kho

    1. Nıco

      Nıco

      xD oui ça va bien 😘 

    2. [X]pErT-
  13. YEAH happy Rain Day 😜

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